NVMe

One of the key drivers to increase capacity in next generation storage has been to increase the number of bits that can be stored per cell. The easy jump of one to two bits-per-cell gives a straight 100% increase, in exchange for more control needed to read/write the bit but also limits the cell endurance. We’ve seen commercialization of storage up to four bits-per-cell, and talk about five. A Japanese company is now ready to start talking about their new 7 bits-per-cell solution. Image courtesy of Plextor, up to 4 bits-per-cell Moving from one to two bits-per-cell gives an easy doubling of capacity, and moving to three bits-per-cell is only another 50% increase. As more bits are added, the value of adding those bits diminishes, but...

Samsung SSD Global Summit 2014: 845 DC Pro with V-NAND, SM951 with NVMe Support

Every year for the past three years, Samsung has flown a bunch of media from all around the world for their SSD Global Summit. The Summit serves as an...

17 by Kristian Vättö on 7/4/2014

The Intel SSD DC P3700 Review Part 2: NVMe on Client Workloads

Last week we reviewed Intel's first NVMe drive: the DC P3700. Based on a modified version of the controller in Intel's SSD DC S3700/S3500, the P3700 moves to an...

36 by Anand Lal Shimpi on 6/10/2014

AnandTech Participates in Roundtable Discussion with Intel and Supermicro about P3700 and NVMe

Earlier this evening, Intel announced a new family of NVMe based PCIe SSDs, including the P3700. I reviewed a 1.6TB version of the P3700 here. A few weeks ago...

12 by Anand Lal Shimpi on 6/3/2014

Intel SSD DC P3700 Review: The PCIe SSD Transition Begins with NVMe

In 2008 Intel introduced its first SSD, the X25-M, and with it Intel ushered in a new era of primary storage based on non-volatile memory. Intel may have been...

85 by Anand Lal Shimpi on 6/3/2014

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now